Passive Fire Protection Risk Assessment

This seminar aims to deliver information and tools to make good decisions on what is reasonable and practicable when addressing fire and smoke stopping deficiencies in existing buildings.

Description

Questionable fire and smoke stopping in New Zealand buildings has been widely reported recently.

Determining the extent of the problem has been difficult. Many components of passive fire protection (PFP) are typically not easy to access or assess. Poor performance of PFP will not be apparent until a fire occurs.

This problem has been brought to a head in buildings currently undergoing extensive weathertightness remediation work. Consent for weathertightness remediation work falls under section 112 of the Building Act 2004, which requires the building to comply as nearly as is reasonably practicable (ANARP) with the Building Code provisions for means of escape from fire. PFP plays a key role in maintaining a safe means of escape during a fire. The cost of making the PFP compliant is significant and can be on the same order of magnitude as the proposed alteration work itself. 

This seminar aims to deliver information and tools to make good decisions on what is reasonable and practicable when addressing fire and smoke stopping deficiencies in existing buildings. The seminar will describe the research (including testing) to date to develop a process for assessing whether it is reasonable and practicable to address PFP non-compliance. Examples of a risk analysis toll already used in industry for this purpose will be provided. 

You will take away an understanding of the options for determining fire and smoke stopping compliance, what kind of information should be collected, and have tools to technically evaluate proposed options.

Presenters

Kevin Frank- Fire Research Engineer, BRANZ

Greg North- Associate Fire Engineer, Beca

Further information

 

 


 

  

 

For assistance, please contact us on 04 237 1170